Dystopian Short Stories Online

Here are some short stories of dystopian societies.

“The Era” by Nana Kwame Adjei-Brenya

Ben is in school learning about the Long Big War and the Big Quick War. Ben isn’t optimized; he’s a clear-born. His sister, Marlene, is a rarity; her optiselection made her a para-one. She’s highly ambitious. Everyone receives regular helpings of Good at breakfast to function normally. Ben goes to the nurse for more.

This story can be read in the Amazon preview of The Best American Short Stories 2019. (39% into preview)

“The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson

On a summer morning, citizens of a small village are anticipating their annual lottery, a local tradition that is believed to bring a good harvest. The children gather first, making their usual preparations. The women and men arrive and make sure their whole family is present. Mr. Summers arrives with the black wooden box.

This story can be read in the preview of Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories(10% in)

“Harrison Bergeron” by Kurt Vonnegut

All Americans are equal—no one is allowed to be better than anyone else in any way. An exceptional fourteen-year-old, Harrison, is taken away from his parents by the government.

This is the first story in the preview of Welcome to the Monkey House: Stories.

“Red Card” by S. L. Gilbow

Linda Jackson shoots her husband. The general reaction of the public is favorable. She reports her “enforcement” to the authorities and prepares to follow proper procedure as the holder of a red card.

This story can be read in the preview of Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories(24% in)

“2 B R 0 2 B” by Kurt Vonnegut

Life is almost perfect—no prisons, poverty, wars, disease or death. The US population is maintained at 40 million. Edward Wehling is at the hospital, and is in despair. His wife is going to give birth to triplets. Due to population control, this is a major problem.

This is the first story in the preview of Worlds of If Superpack #2(11% in)

“Ten With a Flag” by Joseph Paul Haines

In the future when advanced testing is available for pregnant women, a mother finds out that her unborn child will be gifted—the government believes the child will benefit society. The father believes the child is dangerous.

This story can be read in the preview of Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories(48% in)

“The Ones Who Walk Away From Omelas” by Ursula K. Le Guin

The citizens of Omelas are happy, but it’s unclear as to what exactly they have which makes them so. Their happiness depends on one thing, which all the citizens are aware of.

This story can be read in the preview of Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories(66% in)

“Evidence of Love in a Case of Abandonment” by M. Rickert

Certain women are executed every night on television for a crime that isn’t immediately clear. The woman’s name is given and her face is shown, but there are many women who seem to vanish without ever appearing on the show.

This story can be read in the preview of Brave New Worlds: Dystopian Stories(77% in)

“Examination Day” by Henry Slesar

Dickie Jordan has just turned twelve, so it’s time for him to take a Government mandated intelligence test. His parents don’t say much about it. His mother seems to be worried about Dickie’s performance, but his father says he’ll do fine.

Read “Examination Day”

“‘Repent, Harlequin!’ Said the Ticktockman” by Harlan Ellison

The Ones Who Keep The Machine Functioning Smoothly become aware of a disruption, the Harlequin, a man who pulls pranks that throw off their carefully planned schedule. This rebel is becoming a hero to some; they need to find out who he is. Being on time is of the utmost importance—it can even affect how long someone lives.

Read “Repent, Harlequin”